Category Archive Homeopathy Medicine (A -Z)

Mucus in Stool – Causes, Symptoms, Treatment

Mucus in stool may be caused by digestive tract conditions including Anal fissures (tears or cracks) or fistulas (abnormal holes or tubes between organs or tissues) Bacterial gastrointestinal infection, such as Salmonella food poisoning, Campylobacter infection, or traveler’s diarrhea. Cancer of the digestive tract.

Mucus is a slimy, slippery substance produced by the body’s mucous membranes including that of the intestines. The function of mucus is mainly to lubricate and protect against bacteria. Mucus is composed of mucin, water, and leukocytes. The presence of a small quantity of mucus in the stool is normal. But when a person passes a large amount of mucus in the stool, then it needs to be investigated. Mucus in the stool may be transparent, white, yellow, bloody, or green in color. Homeopathic medicines for mucus in stool help clear out the main causative factor.

Causes of Mucus in Stool

The causes of mucus in the stool are Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn’s disease, Dysentery, Bacterial and Parasitic infections. The symptoms that may accompany mucus in the stool are abdominal cramps, bleeding from the rectum, bloated abdomen, diarrhea, or constipation. These symptoms occur depending on the reason behind the mucus in the stool.

What causes mucus in stool?

The digestive tract normally produces some mucus to help digested food and waste slide through it. Abnormal amounts of mucus in the stool may be caused by a variety of conditions ranging from inflammation and infection to obstruction and cancer.

Mucus in the stool may be caused by digestive tract conditions including:

  • Anal fissures (tears or cracks) or fistulas (abnormal holes or tubes between organs or tissues)\
  • Bacterial gastrointestinal infection, such as Salmonella food poisoning, Campylobacter infection, or traveler’s diarrhea
  • Cancer of the digestive tract
  • Celiac disease (severe sensitivity to gluten from wheat and other grains that causes intestinal damage)
  • Diverticulitis (inflammation of an abnormal pocket in the colon)
  • Food allergies (allergic reaction to certain foods)
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis)
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS; digestive discomfort that does not cause intestinal damage or serious disease)
  • Lactose intolerance (an inability to digest lactose, the sugar in dairy products)
  • Parasite infections such as Giardia infection
  • Rectal ulcers
  • Viral gastroenteritis (viral infection of the digestive tract, also called stomach flu or intestinal flu)
  • Bowel obstruction
  • Colonic volvulus (twisting of the colon)
  • Intussusception (telescoping of the intestines into themselves, which can reduce blood supply, cause obstruction, and tissue death)

Symptoms  of Mucus in stool

Mucus in stool may accompany other symptoms, which vary depending on the underlying disease, disorder or condition. Symptoms that frequently affect the digestive tract may also involve other body systems.

Mucus in the stool may accompany other symptoms affecting the digestive tract including:

  • Abdominal pain or cramping
  • Abdominal swelling, distension, or bloating
  • Abnormally foul-smelling stools
  • Bloody stool (the blood may be red, black, or tarry in texture)
  • Changes in stool color or consistency
  • Diarrhea
  • Fecal incontinence (inability to control stools)
  • Gas
  • Nausea with or without vomiting
  • Painful bowel movements
  • Urgent need to pass stool

Other symptoms that may occur along with mucus in stool

Mucus in the stool may accompany symptoms related to other body systems including:

  • Body aches
  • Fever
  • General ill feeling
  • Hives
  • Bloody stool (the blood may be red, black or tarry in texture)
  • Change in level of consciousness or alertness, such as passing out or unresponsiveness
  • Change in mental status or sudden behavior change, such as confusion, delirium, lethargy, hallucinations and delusions
  • High fever (higher than 101 degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Not producing any urine or an infant who does not produce the usual amount of wet diapers
  • Pus in the stool
  • Rapid heart rate (tachycardia)
  • The rigidity of the abdomen
  • Severe abdominal, rectal or anal pain
  • Vomiting blood or rectal bleeding

Treatment

Once your doctor has made a diagnosis, they will prescribe treatment. Lifestyle changes may resolve the issue for some. Suggestions may include:

  • Increase your fluid intake.
  • Eat foods rich in probiotics or supplements that contain probiotics, such as Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus.
  • Consume anti-inflammatory foods, such as low-acid and nonspicy foods.
  • Get a healthy balance of fiber, carbohydrates, and fat in your diet.

Prescription medications and ongoing treatment may be necessary for people with chronic conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, cystic fibrosis, ulcerative colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome.

A combination of lifestyle changes, medications, and possible surgical procedures may help relieve conditions such as anal fissures and fistulas.

Homeopathic Medicines for Mucus in Stool

Homeopathy treatment for mucus in stool is a highly effective and safe way to address the problem. The selection of the homeopathy medicine for mucus in stool is made after noting the character of mucus and other symptoms like diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and abdominal cramps. These medicines work wonderfully in treating mucus in stool and its related symptoms. The best remedies used in the homeopathy treatment for mucus in the stool are Aloe Socotrina, Merc Sol, Colchicum, Argentum Nitricum, Podophyllum, and Nux Vomica.

1. Aloe Socotrina – For Mucus in Stool with Diarrhea

Aloe Socotrina is an excellent medicine for mucus in stool. It works well in cases where diarrhea is accompanied by mucus in stool. The stool passed is watery and has a large quantity of mucus in it. There is a constant bearing down sensation in the rectum. Rumbling and gurgling in the rectum is also felt. There is an urge to pass stool immediately after eating or drinking. An urgency to pass stool is also a symptom. Along with this, the abdomen feels bloated and heavy.

2. Merc Sol – For Mucus and Blood in Stool

Merc Sol offers great help in cases where in addition to mucus, there is the passage of blood in the stool. It is accompanied by severe pain in the abdomen. There is a constant and recurrent urge to pass stool. The stool is scanty and may have an offensive or sour smell. Chilliness and weakness are also present. Other accompanying symptoms are severe pain and a burning sensation in the anus. Flatulent bloating of the abdomen may also occur.

3. Colchicum – For Transparent Jelly Like Mucus in Stool

Colchicum is great medicine for clear jelly-like mucus in the stool. In such cases, the stool is changeable in character. It may be green, yellow, or red in color; and is scanty or watery. Agonizing pain in the rectum remains for a long time after the passing of stool. Another characteristic feature is a severe pain in the abdomen which may be relieved by bending over. Intense nausea is also a symptom.

4. Argentum Nitricum and Gambogia – For Green Mucus in Stool

Argentum Nitricum and Gambogia both are good treatments for mucus in stool. The symptoms of using Argentum Nitricum are green mucus in stool, the urge to pass a stool after eating or drinking, highly offensive stool, excessive flatulence, and a distended and colicky abdomen from flatulence. The characteristic features of using Gambogia are dark green mucus in stool, gushing diarrhea, forcible ejection of stool, and a gurgling or rumbling in the abdomen.

5. Podophyllum – For Yellow Mucus in Stool

Podophyllum is a good choice of medicine for mucus in the stool. The stool is yellowish or green in color and is highly offensive. The stool is pushed out with force and is gushing in nature. Passing of the stool is usually painless. Prolapse of the rectum before or with stool is also a symptom indicating the use of this natural remedy. The anus may be swollen and sore, and there may be a burning sensation present in the anus.

6. Nux Vomica – For Mucus in Stool with Marked Tenesmus

Nux Vomica is a high-grade medicine for mucus in stool. It works well in cases where there is a constant and recurrent desire to pass stool. The urge to pass stool is continual and ineffectual. The stool, passed with mucus, is scanty and unsatisfactory. There is a pain in the abdomen that is relieved for a short while after passing stool. Nausea, vomiting, and acidity are the other symptoms that may arise.

References

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Wood Spider; Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effects

Wood Spider/Harpagophytum also called wood spider and most commonly devil’s claw is a genus of plants in the sesame family, native to southern Africa. Plants of the genus owe their common name “devil’s claw” to the peculiar appearance of their hooked fruit. Several species of North American plants in genus Proboscidea and certain species of Pisonia are however also known by this name. Devil’s claw’s tuberous roots are used in folk medicine to reduce pain.

Devil’s Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, is verbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonisedStaphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. 

Wood Spider

Indications of Devil’s Claw

Devil’s Claw was completely ineffective in reducing edema of the rat hindfoot induced by either lambda-carrageenan or Mycobacterium butyricum. At concentrations of up to 1 x 10(5) microgram/ml, Devil’s Claw was also ineffective as an in-vitro inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase. These results indicate that Devil’s Claw lacks the anti-inflammatory properties possessed by all antiarthritic drugs of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory analgesic type.

  • Preparations of the plant or its extracts, such as harpagoside – [rx] are presumed to have used in folk medicine and phytotherapy as an anti-inflammatory herbal drug or dietary supplement.[rx] Although there is no accepted clinical evidence of its efficacy and bioavailability, limited effects were noted for treating lower back pain and osteoarthritis.[rx] A Cochrane review of clinical research noted that devil’s claw seems to reduce low back pain more than placebo, although evidence was of moderate quality at best.[rx]
  • Back pain Taking devil’s claw by mouth seems to reduce low-back pain. Devil’s claw seems to work about as well as some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • Osteoarthritis Taking devil’s claw alone or along with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) seems to help decrease osteoarthritis-related pain. Some evidence suggests that devil’s claw works about as well as diacerein (a slow-acting drug for osteoarthritis that is not available in the U.S.) for improving osteoarthritis pain in the hip and knee after 16 weeks of treatment. Some people taking devil’s claw seem to be able to lower the dose of NSAIDs they need for pain relief.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) Early research suggests that taking devil’s claw extract by mouth might not improve RA.
  • Gout
  • High cholesterol
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle pain
  • Migraine
  • Headache
  • Skin injuries and conditions
  • Upset stomach

Contraindications of Devil’s Claw

Wood Spider

Do not use with antiarrhythmic, chronotropic, or inotropic medicines. Because of the bitterness of the preparation and consequent increase in gastric secretion, devil’s claw is contraindicated in patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Documented oxytocic adverse effects. Avoid use.

Dosage of Devil’s Claw

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

  • For osteoarthritis – 2-2.6 grams of devil’s claw extract has been taken in up to three divided doses daily for up to 4 months. A specific combination product providing 600 mg of devil’s claw, 400 mg of turmeric, and 300 mg of bromelain has been taken 2-3 three times daily for up to 2 months.
  • For back pain – 0.6-2.4 grams of devil’s claw extract has been taken daily, usually in divided doses, for up to 1 year.

Side Effects and Interactions of Devil’s Claw

Devil’s claw appears to be safe when taken in doses up to 2,610 mg daily, though long-term effects have not been investigated [rx].

Reported side effects are mild, the most common being diarrhea. Rarer adverse effects include allergic reactions, headache and coughing (30Trusted Source).

  • Heart problems, high blood pressure, low blood pressure – Since devil’s claw can affect heart rate, heartbeat, and blood pressure, it might harm people with disorders of the heart and circulatory system. If you have one of these conditions, talk with your healthcare provider before starting devil’s claw.
  • Heart disorders – Studies have indicated that devil’s claw can affect heart rate, heartbeat and blood pressure.
  • Diabetes – Devil’s claw may reduce blood sugar levels and intensify the effects of diabetes medications.
  • Gallstones – Use of devil’s claw may increase the formation of bile and make problems worse for those with gallstones.
  • Stomach ulcers – Production of acid in the stomach can increase with the use of devil’s claw, which may aggravate peptic ulcers.
  • NSAIDs – Devil’s claw may slow the absorption of popular NSAIDs, such as Motrin, Celebrex, Feldene and Voltaren.
  • Blood thinners – Devil’s claw may enhance the effects of Coumadin (also known as warfarin), which may lead to increased bleeding and bruising.
  • Stomach acid reducers – Devil’s claw may decrease the effects of stomach acid reducers, such as Pepcid, Zantac, Prilosec, and Prevacid.

This is not an all-inclusive list of medication interactions. To be on the safe side, always discuss your use of supplements with your doctor.

References

Wood Spider

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Harpagophytum, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effect

Harpagophytum also called wood spider and most commonly devil’s claw is a genus of plants in the sesame family, native to southern Africa. Plants of the genus owe their common name “devil’s claw” to the peculiar appearance of their hooked fruit. Several species of North American plants in genus Proboscidea and certain species of Pisonia are however also known by this name. Devil’s claw’s tuberous roots are used in folk medicine to reduce pain.

Devil’s Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, is verbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonisedStaphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. 

Harpagophytum

Indications of Devil’s Claw

Devil’s Claw was completely ineffective in reducing edema of the rat hindfoot induced by either lambda-carrageenan or Mycobacterium butyricum. At concentrations of up to 1 x 10(5) microgram/ml, Devil’s Claw was also ineffective as an in-vitro inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase. These results indicate that Devil’s Claw lacks the anti-inflammatory properties possessed by all antiarthritic drugs of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory analgesic type.

  • Preparations of the plant or its extracts, such as harpagoside – [rx] are presumed to have used in folk medicine and phytotherapy as an anti-inflammatory herbal drug or dietary supplement.[rx] Although there is no accepted clinical evidence of its efficacy and bioavailability, limited effects were noted for treating lower back pain and osteoarthritis.[rx] A Cochrane review of clinical research noted that devil’s claw seems to reduce low back pain more than placebo, although evidence was of moderate quality at best.[rx]
  • Back pain Taking devil’s claw by mouth seems to reduce low-back pain. Devil’s claw seems to work about as well as some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • Osteoarthritis Taking devil’s claw alone or along with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) seems to help decrease osteoarthritis-related pain. Some evidence suggests that devil’s claw works about as well as diacerein (a slow-acting drug for osteoarthritis that is not available in the U.S.) for improving osteoarthritis pain in the hip and knee after 16 weeks of treatment. Some people taking devil’s claw seem to be able to lower the dose of NSAIDs they need for pain relief.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) Early research suggests that taking devil’s claw extract by mouth might not improve RA.
  • Gout
  • High cholesterol
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle pain
  • Migraine
  • Headache
  • Skin injuries and conditions
  • Upset stomach

Contraindications of Devil’s Claw

Harpagophytum

Do not use with antiarrhythmic, chronotropic, or inotropic medicines. Because of the bitterness of the preparation and consequent increase in gastric secretion, devil’s claw is contraindicated in patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Documented oxytocic adverse effects. Avoid use.

Dosage of Devil’s Claw

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

  • For osteoarthritis – 2-2.6 grams of devil’s claw extract has been taken in up to three divided doses daily for up to 4 months. A specific combination product providing 600 mg of devil’s claw, 400 mg of turmeric, and 300 mg of bromelain has been taken 2-3 three times daily for up to 2 months.
  • For back pain – 0.6-2.4 grams of devil’s claw extract has been taken daily, usually in divided doses, for up to 1 year.

Side Effects and Interactions of Devil’s Claw

Devil’s claw appears to be safe when taken in doses up to 2,610 mg daily, though long-term effects have not been investigated [rx].

Reported side effects are mild, the most common being diarrhea. Rarer adverse effects include allergic reactions, headache and coughing (30Trusted Source).

  • Heart problems, high blood pressure, low blood pressure – Since devil’s claw can affect heart rate, heartbeat, and blood pressure, it might harm people with disorders of the heart and circulatory system. If you have one of these conditions, talk with your healthcare provider before starting devil’s claw.
  • Heart disorders – Studies have indicated that devil’s claw can affect heart rate, heartbeat and blood pressure.
  • Diabetes – Devil’s claw may reduce blood sugar levels and intensify the effects of diabetes medications.
  • Gallstones – Use of devil’s claw may increase the formation of bile and make problems worse for those with gallstones.
  • Stomach ulcers – Production of acid in the stomach can increase with the use of devil’s claw, which may aggravate peptic ulcers.
  • NSAIDs – Devil’s claw may slow the absorption of popular NSAIDs, such as Motrin, Celebrex, Feldene and Voltaren.
  • Blood thinners – Devil’s claw may enhance the effects of Coumadin (also known as warfarin), which may lead to increased bleeding and bruising.
  • Stomach acid reducers – Devil’s claw may decrease the effects of stomach acid reducers, such as Pepcid, Zantac, Prilosec, and Prevacid.

This is not an all-inclusive list of medication interactions. To be on the safe side, always discuss your use of supplements with your doctor.

References

Harpagophytum

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Grapple Plant, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effect

Grapple Plant/Devil’s claw/Harpagophytum also called wood spider and most commonly devil’s claw is a genus of plants in the sesame family, native to southern Africa. Plants of the genus owe their common name “devil’s claw” to the peculiar appearance of their hooked fruit. Several species of North American plants in genus Proboscidea and certain species of Pisonia are however also known by this name. Devil’s claw’s tuberous roots are used in folk medicine to reduce pain.

Devil’s Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, is verbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonisedStaphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. 

Grapple Plant

Indications of Devil’s Claw

Devil’s Claw was completely ineffective in reducing edema of the rat hindfoot induced by either lambda-carrageenan or Mycobacterium butyricum. At concentrations of up to 1 x 10(5) microgram/ml, Devil’s Claw was also ineffective as an in-vitro inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase. These results indicate that Devil’s Claw lacks the anti-inflammatory properties possessed by all antiarthritic drugs of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory analgesic type.

  • Preparations of the plant or its extracts, such as harpagoside – [rx] are presumed to have used in folk medicine and phytotherapy as an anti-inflammatory herbal drug or dietary supplement.[rx] Although there is no accepted clinical evidence of its efficacy and bioavailability, limited effects were noted for treating lower back pain and osteoarthritis.[rx] A Cochrane review of clinical research noted that devil’s claw seems to reduce low back pain more than placebo, although evidence was of moderate quality at best.[rx]
  • Back pain Taking devil’s claw by mouth seems to reduce low-back pain. Devil’s claw seems to work about as well as some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • Osteoarthritis Taking devil’s claw alone or along with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) seems to help decrease osteoarthritis-related pain. Some evidence suggests that devil’s claw works about as well as diacerein (a slow-acting drug for osteoarthritis that is not available in the U.S.) for improving osteoarthritis pain in the hip and knee after 16 weeks of treatment. Some people taking devil’s claw seem to be able to lower the dose of NSAIDs they need for pain relief.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) Early research suggests that taking devil’s claw extract by mouth might not improve RA.
  • Gout
  • High cholesterol
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle pain
  • Migraine
  • Headache
  • Skin injuries and conditions
  • Upset stomach

Contraindications of Devil’s Claw

Grapple Plant

Do not use with antiarrhythmic, chronotropic, or inotropic medicines. Because of the bitterness of the preparation and consequent increase in gastric secretion, devil’s claw is contraindicated in patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Documented oxytocic adverse effects. Avoid use.

Dosage of Devil’s Claw

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

  • For osteoarthritis – 2-2.6 grams of devil’s claw extract has been taken in up to three divided doses daily for up to 4 months. A specific combination product providing 600 mg of devil’s claw, 400 mg of turmeric, and 300 mg of bromelain has been taken 2-3 three times daily for up to 2 months.
  • For back pain – 0.6-2.4 grams of devil’s claw extract has been taken daily, usually in divided doses, for up to 1 year.

Side Effects and Interactions of Devil’s Claw

Devil’s claw appears to be safe when taken in doses up to 2,610 mg daily, though long-term effects have not been investigated [rx].

Reported side effects are mild, the most common being diarrhea. Rarer adverse effects include allergic reactions, headache and coughing (30Trusted Source).

  • Heart problems, high blood pressure, low blood pressure – Since devil’s claw can affect heart rate, heartbeat, and blood pressure, it might harm people with disorders of the heart and circulatory system. If you have one of these conditions, talk with your healthcare provider before starting devil’s claw.
  • Heart disorders – Studies have indicated that devil’s claw can affect heart rate, heartbeat and blood pressure.
  • Diabetes – Devil’s claw may reduce blood sugar levels and intensify the effects of diabetes medications.
  • Gallstones – Use of devil’s claw may increase the formation of bile and make problems worse for those with gallstones.
  • Stomach ulcers – Production of acid in the stomach can increase with the use of devil’s claw, which may aggravate peptic ulcers.
  • NSAIDs – Devil’s claw may slow the absorption of popular NSAIDs, such as Motrin, Celebrex, Feldene and Voltaren.
  • Blood thinners – Devil’s claw may enhance the effects of Coumadin (also known as warfarin), which may lead to increased bleeding and bruising.
  • Stomach acid reducers – Devil’s claw may decrease the effects of stomach acid reducers, such as Pepcid, Zantac, Prilosec, and Prevacid.

This is not an all-inclusive list of medication interactions. To be on the safe side, always discuss your use of supplements with your doctor.

References

Grapple Plant

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[Total: 0 Average: 0]

Devil’s Claw; Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions

Devil’s claw/Harpagophytum also called grapple plantwood spider and most commonly devil’s claw is a genus of plants in the sesame family, native to southern Africa. Plants of the genus owe their common name “devil’s claw” to the peculiar appearance of their hooked fruit. Several species of North American plants in genus Proboscidea and certain species of Pisonia are however also known by this name. Devil’s claw’s tuberous roots are used in folk medicine to reduce pain.

Devil’s Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, is verbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonisedStaphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. 

Devil's claw

Indications of Devil’s Claw

Devil’s Claw was completely ineffective in reducing edema of the rat hindfoot induced by either lambda-carrageenan or Mycobacterium butyricum. At concentrations of up to 1 x 10(5) microgram/ml, Devil’s Claw was also ineffective as an in-vitro inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase. These results indicate that Devil’s Claw lacks the anti-inflammatory properties possessed by all antiarthritic drugs of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory analgesic type.

  • Preparations of the plant or its extracts, such as harpagoside – [rx] are presumed to have used in folk medicine and phytotherapy as an anti-inflammatory herbal drug or dietary supplement.[rx] Although there is no accepted clinical evidence of its efficacy and bioavailability, limited effects were noted for treating lower back pain and osteoarthritis.[rx] A Cochrane review of clinical research noted that devil’s claw seems to reduce low back pain more than placebo, although evidence was of moderate quality at best.[rx]
  • Back pain Taking devil’s claw by mouth seems to reduce low-back pain. Devil’s claw seems to work about as well as some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • Osteoarthritis Taking devil’s claw alone or along with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) seems to help decrease osteoarthritis-related pain. Some evidence suggests that devil’s claw works about as well as diacerein (a slow-acting drug for osteoarthritis that is not available in the U.S.) for improving osteoarthritis pain in the hip and knee after 16 weeks of treatment. Some people taking devil’s claw seem to be able to lower the dose of NSAIDs they need for pain relief.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) Early research suggests that taking devil’s claw extract by mouth might not improve RA.
  • Gout
  • High cholesterol
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle pain
  • Migraine
  • Headache
  • Skin injuries and conditions
  • Upset stomach

Contraindications of Devil’s Claw

Devil's claw

Do not use with antiarrhythmic, chronotropic, or inotropic medicines. Because of the bitterness of the preparation and consequent increase in gastric secretion, devil’s claw is contraindicated in patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Documented oxytocic adverse effects. Avoid use.

Dosage of Devil’s Claw

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

  • For osteoarthritis – 2-2.6 grams of devil’s claw extract has been taken in up to three divided doses daily for up to 4 months. A specific combination product providing 600 mg of devil’s claw, 400 mg of turmeric, and 300 mg of bromelain has been taken 2-3 three times daily for up to 2 months.
  • For back pain – 0.6-2.4 grams of devil’s claw extract has been taken daily, usually in divided doses, for up to 1 year.

Side Effects and Interactions of Devil’s Claw

Devil’s claw appears to be safe when taken in doses up to 2,610 mg daily, though long-term effects have not been investigated [rx].

Reported side effects are mild, the most common being diarrhea. Rarer adverse effects include allergic reactions, headache and coughing (30Trusted Source).

  • Heart problems, high blood pressure, low blood pressure – Since devil’s claw can affect heart rate, heartbeat, and blood pressure, it might harm people with disorders of the heart and circulatory system. If you have one of these conditions, talk with your healthcare provider before starting devil’s claw.
  • Heart disorders – Studies have indicated that devil’s claw can affect heart rate, heartbeat and blood pressure.
  • Diabetes – Devil’s claw may reduce blood sugar levels and intensify the effects of diabetes medications.
  • Gallstones – Use of devil’s claw may increase the formation of bile and make problems worse for those with gallstones.
  • Stomach ulcers – Production of acid in the stomach can increase with the use of devil’s claw, which may aggravate peptic ulcers.
  • NSAIDs – Devil’s claw may slow the absorption of popular NSAIDs, such as Motrin, Celebrex, Feldene and Voltaren.
  • Blood thinners – Devil’s claw may enhance the effects of Coumadin (also known as warfarin), which may lead to increased bleeding and bruising.
  • Stomach acid reducers – Devil’s claw may decrease the effects of stomach acid reducers, such as Pepcid, Zantac, Prilosec, and Prevacid.

This is not an all-inclusive list of medication interactions. To be on the safe side, always discuss your use of supplements with your doctor.

References

Devil's claw

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Meadowbloom, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effects

Meadowbloom/Ranunculus bulbosus commonly known as St. Anthony’s turnip[rx] or bulbous buttercup is a perennialGoldcup member of the buttercup family. It has attractive yellow flowers, and deeply divided, three-lobed long-petioled basal leaves. Bulbous buttercup is known to form tufts.

Another name

Bouton d’Or Bulbeux, Crowfoot, Cuckoo Buds, Frog foot, Frogwort, Goldcup, Hierba Velluda, King’s Cup, Meadowbloom, Pied-de-Coq, Pied-de-Corbin, Pilewort, Ranúnculo Bulboso, Ranunculus bulbosus, Rave de Saint-Antoine, Renoncule Bulbeuse, St. Anthony’s Turnip.

Materia Medica of Pilewort

  • Mind – Irritable; holds everything in contempt. Full of desires, for what they know not.
  • Head – Bones of the skull feel crushed or bruised. Pain extends to teeth and root of the tongue.
  • Eyes – Inflamed, red. Pain through eyeballs. Profuse lachrymation. Cornea dim. Eyes tire from near vision. State of vision constantly changing. Spasm of accommodation from the irritable weakness of the ciliary muscle. Nausea from looking on moving objects.
  • Face – Blue rings around eyes. Periodical orbital neuralgia, with lachrymation, photophobia, and smarting eyelids.
  • Nose – Coryza, with stoppage of nose and nausea. Epistaxis.
  • Stomach – Tongue usually clean. Mouth, moist; much saliva. Constant nausea and vomiting, with pale, twitching of face. Vomits food, bile, blood, mucus. Stomach feels relaxed as if hanging down. Hiccough.
  • Abdomen – Amebic dysentery with tenesmus; while straining pain so great that it nauseates; little thirst. Cutting, clutching; worse, around the navel. Body rigid; stretched out stiff.
  • Stools – Pitch-like green as grass, like frothy molasses, with griping at the navel. Dysenteric, slimy.
  • Female – Uterine hæmorrhage, profuse, bright, gushing, with nausea. Vomiting during pregnancy. Pain from navel to the uterus. Menses too early and too profuse.
  • Respiratory – Dyspnœa; constant constriction in the chest. Asthma. Yearly attacks of difficult shortness of breathing. Continued sneezing; coryza; a wheezing cough. Cough incessant and violent, with every breath. Chest seems full of phlegm but does not yield to coughing. Bubbling rales. A suffocative cough; the child becomes stiff, and blue in the face. Whooping-cough, with a nosebleed, and from the mouth. Bleeding from lungs, with nausea; feeling of constriction; rattling cough. Croup. Hæmoptysis from slightest exertion (Miller). Hoarseness, especially at end of a cold. Complete aphonia.
  • Fever – Intermittent fever, irregular cases, after Quinine. Slightest chill with much heat, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnœa. Relapses from improper diet.
  • Sleep – With eyes half open. Shocks in all limbs on going to sleep (Ign).
  • Extremities – Body stretched stiff, followed by spasmodic jerking of arms towards each other.
  • Skin – Pale, lax. Blue around eyes. Military rash.

Uses/ Indications of Pilewort

  • Skin diseases
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Nerve pain
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Meningitis
  • Alcoholism
  • Breast, pain below
  • Chest pains
  • Delirium tremens
  • Diarrhea
  • Dropsy
  • Dyspnoea
  • Eczema
  • Epilepsy
  • Gastralgia
  • Hiccough
  • Hydrocele
  • Jaundice
  • Neuralgia
  • Nyctalopia
  • Pemphigus
  • Pleuritic adhesion
  • Pleurodynia
  • Rheumatism
  • Spinal irritation
  • Warts
  • Writer’s cramp

Dosage of Pilewort

  • Adults/Children: Dissolve 5 pellets in the mouth 3 times a day until symptoms are relieved or as directed by a physician.

References

Meadowbloom

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King’s Cup, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effects

King’s Cup/Ranunculus bulbosus commonly known as St. Anthony’s turnip[rx] or bulbous buttercup is a perennialGoldcup member of the buttercup family. It has attractive yellow flowers, and deeply divided, three-lobed long-petioled basal leaves. Bulbous buttercup is known to form tufts.

Another name

Bouton d’Or Bulbeux, Crowfoot, Cuckoo Buds, Frog foot, Frogwort, Goldcup, Hierba Velluda, King’s Cup, Meadowbloom, Pied-de-Coq, Pied-de-Corbin, Pilewort, Ranúnculo Bulboso, Ranunculus bulbosus, Rave de Saint-Antoine, Renoncule Bulbeuse, St. Anthony’s Turnip.

Materia Medica of Pilewort

  • Mind – Irritable; holds everything in contempt. Full of desires, for what they know not.
  • Head – Bones of the skull feel crushed or bruised. Pain extends to teeth and root of the tongue.
  • Eyes – Inflamed, red. Pain through eyeballs. Profuse lachrymation. Cornea dim. Eyes tire from near vision. State of vision constantly changing. Spasm of accommodation from the irritable weakness of the ciliary muscle. Nausea from looking on moving objects.
  • Face – Blue rings around eyes. Periodical orbital neuralgia, with lachrymation, photophobia, and smarting eyelids.
  • Nose – Coryza, with stoppage of nose and nausea. Epistaxis.
  • Stomach – Tongue usually clean. Mouth, moist; much saliva. Constant nausea and vomiting, with pale, twitching of face. Vomits food, bile, blood, mucus. Stomach feels relaxed as if hanging down. Hiccough.
  • Abdomen – Amebic dysentery with tenesmus; while straining pain so great that it nauseates; little thirst. Cutting, clutching; worse, around the navel. Body rigid; stretched out stiff.
  • Stools – Pitch-like green as grass, like frothy molasses, with griping at the navel. Dysenteric, slimy.
  • Female – Uterine hæmorrhage, profuse, bright, gushing, with nausea. Vomiting during pregnancy. Pain from navel to the uterus. Menses too early and too profuse.
  • Respiratory – Dyspnœa; constant constriction in the chest. Asthma. Yearly attacks of difficult shortness of breathing. Continued sneezing; coryza; a wheezing cough. Cough incessant and violent, with every breath. Chest seems full of phlegm but does not yield to coughing. Bubbling rales. A suffocative cough; the child becomes stiff, and blue in the face. Whooping-cough, with a nosebleed, and from the mouth. Bleeding from lungs, with nausea; feeling of constriction; rattling cough. Croup. Hæmoptysis from slightest exertion (Miller). Hoarseness, especially at end of a cold. Complete aphonia.
  • Fever – Intermittent fever, irregular cases, after Quinine. Slightest chill with much heat, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnœa. Relapses from improper diet.
  • Sleep – With eyes half open. Shocks in all limbs on going to sleep (Ign).
  • Extremities – Body stretched stiff, followed by spasmodic jerking of arms towards each other.
  • Skin – Pale, lax. Blue around eyes. Military rash.

Uses/ Indications of Pilewort

  • Skin diseases
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Nerve pain
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Meningitis
  • Alcoholism
  • Breast, pain below
  • Chest pains
  • Delirium tremens
  • Diarrhea
  • Dropsy
  • Dyspnoea
  • Eczema
  • Epilepsy
  • Gastralgia
  • Hiccough
  • Hydrocele
  • Jaundice
  • Neuralgia
  • Nyctalopia
  • Pemphigus
  • Pleuritic adhesion
  • Pleurodynia
  • Rheumatism
  • Spinal irritation
  • Warts
  • Writer’s cramp

Dosage of Pilewort

  • Adults/Children: Dissolve 5 pellets in the mouth 3 times a day until symptoms are relieved or as directed by a physician.

References

King's Cup

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Hierba Velluda, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effects

Hierba Velluda/Ranunculus bulbosus commonly known as St. Anthony’s turnip[rx] or bulbous buttercup is a perennialGoldcup member of the buttercup family. It has attractive yellow flowers, and deeply divided, three-lobed long-petioled basal leaves. Bulbous buttercup is known to form tufts.

Another name

Bouton d’Or Bulbeux, Crowfoot, Cuckoo Buds, Frog foot, Frogwort, Goldcup, Hierba Velluda, King’s Cup, Meadowbloom, Pied-de-Coq, Pied-de-Corbin, Pilewort, Ranúnculo Bulboso, Ranunculus bulbosus, Rave de Saint-Antoine, Renoncule Bulbeuse, St. Anthony’s Turnip.

Materia Medica of Pilewort

  • Mind – Irritable; holds everything in contempt. Full of desires, for what they know not.
  • Head – Bones of the skull feel crushed or bruised. Pain extends to teeth and root of the tongue.
  • Eyes – Inflamed, red. Pain through eyeballs. Profuse lachrymation. Cornea dim. Eyes tire from near vision. State of vision constantly changing. Spasm of accommodation from the irritable weakness of the ciliary muscle. Nausea from looking on moving objects.
  • Face – Blue rings around eyes. Periodical orbital neuralgia, with lachrymation, photophobia, and smarting eyelids.
  • Nose – Coryza, with stoppage of nose and nausea. Epistaxis.
  • Stomach – Tongue usually clean. Mouth, moist; much saliva. Constant nausea and vomiting, with pale, twitching of face. Vomits food, bile, blood, mucus. Stomach feels relaxed as if hanging down. Hiccough.
  • Abdomen – Amebic dysentery with tenesmus; while straining pain so great that it nauseates; little thirst. Cutting, clutching; worse, around the navel. Body rigid; stretched out stiff.
  • Stools – Pitch-like green as grass, like frothy molasses, with griping at the navel. Dysenteric, slimy.
  • Female – Uterine hæmorrhage, profuse, bright, gushing, with nausea. Vomiting during pregnancy. Pain from navel to the uterus. Menses too early and too profuse.
  • Respiratory – Dyspnœa; constant constriction in the chest. Asthma. Yearly attacks of difficult shortness of breathing. Continued sneezing; coryza; a wheezing cough. Cough incessant and violent, with every breath. Chest seems full of phlegm but does not yield to coughing. Bubbling rales. A suffocative cough; the child becomes stiff, and blue in the face. Whooping-cough, with a nosebleed, and from the mouth. Bleeding from lungs, with nausea; feeling of constriction; rattling cough. Croup. Hæmoptysis from slightest exertion (Miller). Hoarseness, especially at end of a cold. Complete aphonia.
  • Fever – Intermittent fever, irregular cases, after Quinine. Slightest chill with much heat, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnœa. Relapses from improper diet.
  • Sleep – With eyes half open. Shocks in all limbs on going to sleep (Ign).
  • Extremities – Body stretched stiff, followed by spasmodic jerking of arms towards each other.
  • Skin – Pale, lax. Blue around eyes. Military rash.

Uses/ Indications of Pilewort

  • Skin diseases
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Nerve pain
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Meningitis
  • Alcoholism
  • Breast, pain below
  • Chest pains
  • Delirium tremens
  • Diarrhea
  • Dropsy
  • Dyspnoea
  • Eczema
  • Epilepsy
  • Gastralgia
  • Hiccough
  • Hydrocele
  • Jaundice
  • Neuralgia
  • Nyctalopia
  • Pemphigus
  • Pleuritic adhesion
  • Pleurodynia
  • Rheumatism
  • Spinal irritation
  • Warts
  • Writer’s cramp

Dosage of Pilewort

  • Adults/Children: Dissolve 5 pellets in the mouth 3 times a day until symptoms are relieved or as directed by a physician.

References

Goldcup

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Goldcup, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effects

Goldcup/Ranunculus bulbosus commonly known as St. Anthony’s turnip[rx] or bulbous buttercup is a perennialGoldcup member of the buttercup family. It has attractive yellow flowers, and deeply divided, three-lobed long-petioled basal leaves. Bulbous buttercup is known to form tufts.

Another name

Bouton d’Or Bulbeux, Crowfoot, Cuckoo Buds, Frog foot, Frogwort, Goldcup, Hierba Velluda, King’s Cup, Meadowbloom, Pied-de-Coq, Pied-de-Corbin, Pilewort, Ranúnculo Bulboso, Ranunculus bulbosus, Rave de Saint-Antoine, Renoncule Bulbeuse, St. Anthony’s Turnip.

Materia Medica of Pilewort

  • Mind – Irritable; holds everything in contempt. Full of desires, for what they know not.
  • Head – Bones of the skull feel crushed or bruised. Pain extends to teeth and root of the tongue.
  • Eyes – Inflamed, red. Pain through eyeballs. Profuse lachrymation. Cornea dim. Eyes tire from near vision. State of vision constantly changing. Spasm of accommodation from the irritable weakness of the ciliary muscle. Nausea from looking on moving objects.
  • Face – Blue rings around eyes. Periodical orbital neuralgia, with lachrymation, photophobia, and smarting eyelids.
  • Nose – Coryza, with stoppage of nose and nausea. Epistaxis.
  • Stomach – Tongue usually clean. Mouth, moist; much saliva. Constant nausea and vomiting, with pale, twitching of face. Vomits food, bile, blood, mucus. Stomach feels relaxed as if hanging down. Hiccough.
  • Abdomen – Amebic dysentery with tenesmus; while straining pain so great that it nauseates; little thirst. Cutting, clutching; worse, around the navel. Body rigid; stretched out stiff.
  • Stools – Pitch-like green as grass, like frothy molasses, with griping at the navel. Dysenteric, slimy.
  • Female – Uterine hæmorrhage, profuse, bright, gushing, with nausea. Vomiting during pregnancy. Pain from navel to the uterus. Menses too early and too profuse.
  • Respiratory – Dyspnœa; constant constriction in the chest. Asthma. Yearly attacks of difficult shortness of breathing. Continued sneezing; coryza; a wheezing cough. Cough incessant and violent, with every breath. Chest seems full of phlegm but does not yield to coughing. Bubbling rales. A suffocative cough; the child becomes stiff, and blue in the face. Whooping-cough, with a nosebleed, and from the mouth. Bleeding from lungs, with nausea; feeling of constriction; rattling cough. Croup. Hæmoptysis from slightest exertion (Miller). Hoarseness, especially at end of a cold. Complete aphonia.
  • Fever – Intermittent fever, irregular cases, after Quinine. Slightest chill with much heat, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnœa. Relapses from improper diet.
  • Sleep – With eyes half open. Shocks in all limbs on going to sleep (Ign).
  • Extremities – Body stretched stiff, followed by spasmodic jerking of arms towards each other.
  • Skin – Pale, lax. Blue around eyes. Military rash.

Uses/ Indications of Pilewort

  • Skin diseases
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Nerve pain
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Meningitis
  • Alcoholism
  • Breast, pain below
  • Chest pains
  • Delirium tremens
  • Diarrhea
  • Dropsy
  • Dyspnoea
  • Eczema
  • Epilepsy
  • Gastralgia
  • Hiccough
  • Hydrocele
  • Jaundice
  • Neuralgia
  • Nyctalopia
  • Pemphigus
  • Pleuritic adhesion
  • Pleurodynia
  • Rheumatism
  • Spinal irritation
  • Warts
  • Writer’s cramp

Dosage of Pilewort

  • Adults/Children: Dissolve 5 pellets in the mouth 3 times a day until symptoms are relieved or as directed by a physician.

References

Goldcup

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Frogwort, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effects

Frogwort,/Ranunculus bulbosus commonly known as St. Anthony’s turnip[rx] or bulbous buttercup is a perennial member of the buttercup family. It has attractive yellow flowers, and deeply divided, three-lobed long-petioled basal leaves. Bulbous buttercup is known to form tufts.

Another name

Bouton d’Or Bulbeux, Crowfoot, Cuckoo Buds, Frog foot, Frogwort, Goldcup, Hierba Velluda, King’s Cup, Meadowbloom, Pied-de-Coq, Pied-de-Corbin, Pilewort, Ranúnculo Bulboso, Ranunculus bulbosus, Rave de Saint-Antoine, Renoncule Bulbeuse, St. Anthony’s Turnip.

Materia Medica of Pilewort

  • Mind – Irritable; holds everything in contempt. Full of desires, for what they know not.
  • Head – Bones of the skull feel crushed or bruised. Pain extends to teeth and root of the tongue.
  • Eyes – Inflamed, red. Pain through eyeballs. Profuse lachrymation. Cornea dim. Eyes tire from near vision. State of vision constantly changing. Spasm of accommodation from the irritable weakness of the ciliary muscle. Nausea from looking on moving objects.
  • Face – Blue rings around eyes. Periodical orbital neuralgia, with lachrymation, photophobia, and smarting eyelids.
  • Nose – Coryza, with stoppage of nose and nausea. Epistaxis.
  • Stomach – Tongue usually clean. Mouth, moist; much saliva. Constant nausea and vomiting, with pale, twitching of face. Vomits food, bile, blood, mucus. Stomach feels relaxed as if hanging down. Hiccough.
  • Abdomen – Amebic dysentery with tenesmus; while straining pain so great that it nauseates; little thirst. Cutting, clutching; worse, around the navel. Body rigid; stretched out stiff.
  • Stools – Pitch-like green as grass, like frothy molasses, with griping at the navel. Dysenteric, slimy.
  • Female – Uterine hæmorrhage, profuse, bright, gushing, with nausea. Vomiting during pregnancy. Pain from navel to the uterus. Menses too early and too profuse.
  • Respiratory – Dyspnœa; constant constriction in the chest. Asthma. Yearly attacks of difficult shortness of breathing. Continued sneezing; coryza; a wheezing cough. Cough incessant and violent, with every breath. Chest seems full of phlegm but does not yield to coughing. Bubbling rales. A suffocative cough; the child becomes stiff, and blue in the face. Whooping-cough, with a nosebleed, and from the mouth. Bleeding from lungs, with nausea; feeling of constriction; rattling cough. Croup. Hæmoptysis from slightest exertion (Miller). Hoarseness, especially at end of a cold. Complete aphonia.
  • Fever – Intermittent fever, irregular cases, after Quinine. Slightest chill with much heat, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnœa. Relapses from improper diet.
  • Sleep – With eyes half open. Shocks in all limbs on going to sleep (Ign).
  • Extremities – Body stretched stiff, followed by spasmodic jerking of arms towards each other.
  • Skin – Pale, lax. Blue around eyes. Military rash.

Uses/ Indications of Pilewort

  • Skin diseases
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Nerve pain
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Meningitis
  • Alcoholism
  • Breast, pain below
  • Chest pains
  • Delirium tremens
  • Diarrhea
  • Dropsy
  • Dyspnoea
  • Eczema
  • Epilepsy
  • Gastralgia
  • Hiccough
  • Hydrocele
  • Jaundice
  • Neuralgia
  • Nyctalopia
  • Pemphigus
  • Pleuritic adhesion
  • Pleurodynia
  • Rheumatism
  • Spinal irritation
  • Warts
  • Writer’s cramp

Dosage of Pilewort

  • Adults/Children: Dissolve 5 pellets in the mouth 3 times a day until symptoms are relieved or as directed by a physician.

References

Frogwort

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Frog Foot, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effects

Frog Foot/Ranunculus bulbosus commonly known as St. Anthony’s turnip[rx] or bulbous buttercup is a perennial member of the buttercup family. It has attractive yellow flowers, and deeply divided, three-lobed long-petioled basal leaves. Bulbous buttercup is known to form tufts.

Another name

Bouton d’Or Bulbeux, Crowfoot, Cuckoo Buds, Frog foot, Frogwort, Goldcup, Hierba Velluda, King’s Cup, Meadowbloom, Pied-de-Coq, Pied-de-Corbin, Pilewort, Ranúnculo Bulboso, Ranunculus bulbosus, Rave de Saint-Antoine, Renoncule Bulbeuse, St. Anthony’s Turnip.

Materia Medica of Pilewort

  • Mind – Irritable; holds everything in contempt. Full of desires, for what they know not.
  • Head – Bones of the skull feel crushed or bruised. Pain extends to teeth and root of the tongue.
  • Eyes – Inflamed, red. Pain through eyeballs. Profuse lachrymation. Cornea dim. Eyes tire from near vision. State of vision constantly changing. Spasm of accommodation from the irritable weakness of the ciliary muscle. Nausea from looking on moving objects.
  • Face – Blue rings around eyes. Periodical orbital neuralgia, with lachrymation, photophobia, and smarting eyelids.
  • Nose – Coryza, with stoppage of nose and nausea. Epistaxis.
  • Stomach – Tongue usually clean. Mouth, moist; much saliva. Constant nausea and vomiting, with pale, twitching of face. Vomits food, bile, blood, mucus. Stomach feels relaxed as if hanging down. Hiccough.
  • Abdomen – Amebic dysentery with tenesmus; while straining pain so great that it nauseates; little thirst. Cutting, clutching; worse, around the navel. Body rigid; stretched out stiff.
  • Stools – Pitch-like green as grass, like frothy molasses, with griping at the navel. Dysenteric, slimy.
  • Female – Uterine hæmorrhage, profuse, bright, gushing, with nausea. Vomiting during pregnancy. Pain from navel to the uterus. Menses too early and too profuse.
  • Respiratory – Dyspnœa; constant constriction in the chest. Asthma. Yearly attacks of difficult shortness of breathing. Continued sneezing; coryza; a wheezing cough. Cough incessant and violent, with every breath. Chest seems full of phlegm but does not yield to coughing. Bubbling rales. A suffocative cough; the child becomes stiff, and blue in the face. Whooping-cough, with a nosebleed, and from the mouth. Bleeding from lungs, with nausea; feeling of constriction; rattling cough. Croup. Hæmoptysis from slightest exertion (Miller). Hoarseness, especially at end of a cold. Complete aphonia.
  • Fever – Intermittent fever, irregular cases, after Quinine. Slightest chill with much heat, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnœa. Relapses from improper diet.
  • Sleep – With eyes half open. Shocks in all limbs on going to sleep (Ign).
  • Extremities – Body stretched stiff, followed by spasmodic jerking of arms towards each other.
  • Skin – Pale, lax. Blue around eyes. Military rash.

Uses/ Indications of Pilewort

  • Skin diseases
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Nerve pain
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Meningitis
  • Alcoholism
  • Breast, pain below
  • Chest pains
  • Delirium tremens
  • Diarrhea
  • Dropsy
  • Dyspnoea
  • Eczema
  • Epilepsy
  • Gastralgia
  • Hiccough
  • Hydrocele
  • Jaundice
  • Neuralgia
  • Nyctalopia
  • Pemphigus
  • Pleuritic adhesion
  • Pleurodynia
  • Rheumatism
  • Spinal irritation
  • Warts
  • Writer’s cramp

Dosage of Pilewort

  • Adults/Children: Dissolve 5 pellets in the mouth 3 times a day until symptoms are relieved or as directed by a physician.

References

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Crowfoot, Uses/ Indications, Dosage, Side Effects

Crowfoot/Ranunculus bulbosus commonly known as St. Anthony’s turnip[rx] or bulbous buttercup is a perennial member of the buttercup family. It has attractive yellow flowers, and deeply divided, three-lobed long-petioled basal leaves. Bulbous buttercup is known to form tufts.

Another name

Bouton d’Or Bulbeux, Crowfoot, Cuckoo Buds, Frog foot, Frogwort, Goldcup, Hierba Velluda, King’s Cup, Meadowbloom, Pied-de-Coq, Pied-de-Corbin, Pilewort, Ranúnculo Bulboso, Ranunculus bulbosus, Rave de Saint-Antoine, Renoncule Bulbeuse, St. Anthony’s Turnip.

Materia Medica of Pilewort

  • Mind – Irritable; holds everything in contempt. Full of desires, for what they know not.
  • Head – Bones of the skull feel crushed or bruised. Pain extends to teeth and root of the tongue.
  • Eyes – Inflamed, red. Pain through eyeballs. Profuse lachrymation. Cornea dim. Eyes tire from near vision. State of vision constantly changing. Spasm of accommodation from the irritable weakness of the ciliary muscle. Nausea from looking on moving objects.
  • Face – Blue rings around eyes. Periodical orbital neuralgia, with lachrymation, photophobia, and smarting eyelids.
  • Nose – Coryza, with stoppage of nose and nausea. Epistaxis.
  • Stomach – Tongue usually clean. Mouth, moist; much saliva. Constant nausea and vomiting, with pale, twitching of face. Vomits food, bile, blood, mucus. Stomach feels relaxed as if hanging down. Hiccough.
  • Abdomen – Amebic dysentery with tenesmus; while straining pain so great that it nauseates; little thirst. Cutting, clutching; worse, around the navel. Body rigid; stretched out stiff.
  • Stools – Pitch-like green as grass, like frothy molasses, with griping at the navel. Dysenteric, slimy.
  • Female – Uterine hæmorrhage, profuse, bright, gushing, with nausea. Vomiting during pregnancy. Pain from navel to the uterus. Menses too early and too profuse.
  • Respiratory – Dyspnœa; constant constriction in the chest. Asthma. Yearly attacks of difficult shortness of breathing. Continued sneezing; coryza; a wheezing cough. Cough incessant and violent, with every breath. Chest seems full of phlegm but does not yield to coughing. Bubbling rales. A suffocative cough; the child becomes stiff, and blue in the face. Whooping-cough, with a nosebleed, and from the mouth. Bleeding from lungs, with nausea; feeling of constriction; rattling cough. Croup. Hæmoptysis from slightest exertion (Miller). Hoarseness, especially at end of a cold. Complete aphonia.
  • Fever – Intermittent fever, irregular cases, after Quinine. Slightest chill with much heat, nausea, vomiting, and dyspnœa. Relapses from improper diet.
  • Sleep – With eyes half open. Shocks in all limbs on going to sleep (Ign).
  • Extremities – Body stretched stiff, followed by spasmodic jerking of arms towards each other.
  • Skin – Pale, lax. Blue around eyes. Military rash.

Uses/ Indications of Pilewort

  • Skin diseases
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Nerve pain
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Meningitis
  • Alcoholism
  • Breast, pain below
  • Chest pains
  • Delirium tremens
  • Diarrhea
  • Dropsy
  • Dyspnoea
  • Eczema
  • Epilepsy
  • Gastralgia
  • Hiccough
  • Hydrocele
  • Jaundice
  • Neuralgia
  • Nyctalopia
  • Pemphigus
  • Pleuritic adhesion
  • Pleurodynia
  • Rheumatism
  • Spinal irritation
  • Warts
  • Writer’s cramp

Dosage of Pilewort

  • Adults/Children: Dissolve 5 pellets in the mouth 3 times a day until symptoms are relieved or as directed by a physician.

References

Crowfoot

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