Myrrh Oil Health Benefits – Nutritional Value, Side Effects

Myrrh Oil Health Benefits – Nutritional Value, Side Effects

Myrrh oil comes from a dried resin extracted from the Commiphora myrrha tree, which belongs to the Commiphora plant genus. Just like frankincense, myrrh also comes from the Burseraceae plant family.  Native to Northern Africa and the Middle East, particularly in Somalia, Ethiopia, Arabia, and Yemen, the tree grows up to five meters high, and can be recognized by its light bark, knotted branches, and small white flowers.  The word “myrrh” comes from “murr,” which means “bitter” in Arabic, probably referring to the resin’s bitter taste.

Myrrh oil is one of the oldest essential oils in recorded history. It’s mentioned in Biblical texts, it’s an important part of Ayurvedic medicine in India, and it’s been found in ancient Egyptian tombs that are more than 2,000 years old. It’s known for its rich, smokey, and sweet scent, and science is beginning to study it for potential health benefits.

Myrrh Oil Facts

Myrrh is a resin, or sap-like substance, that comes from a tree called Commiphora myrrha, common in Africa or the Middle East. Myrrh is botanically related to Frankincense and is one of the most widely used essential oils in the world. The myrrh tree is distinctive due to its white flowers and knotted myrrh tree trunk. At times, the tree has very few leaves due to the dry desert conditions where it grows. To gather myrrh the tree trunks must be cut into to release the resin. The resin is allowed to dry and begins to look like tears all along the tree trunk. The resin is then collected and the essential oil is made from the sap via steam distillation.

The produced oil from the resin of myrrh smells pleasantly rich, warm, and balsamic. The resin is dark brown, while the pure oil derived is pale yellow in color. The oil is a little thick but you can still use the dropper included in every oil purchase from Simply Earth. The rich aroma makes it a great base for fragrances and perfumes. Myrrh essential oil blends well with Frankincense, Lavender, Rose, Rosewood, Sandalwood, Tea Tree, and Thyme.

Name Myrrh essential oil
Scientific Name Commiphora Myrrha
Native or another name Native to Somalia, Yemen, Eastern Ethiopia, the Arabian Peninsula, and the eastern Mediterranean.Abyssinian Myrrh, African Myrrh, Amyris kataf, Arabian Myrrh, Bal, Balsamodendron Myrrha, Balsamodendrum habessinicum, Balsamodendrum myrrha, Bdellium, Bol, Bola, Commiphora, Commiphora abyssinica, Commiphora erythraea, Commiphora habessinica, Commiphora kataf, Commiphora madagascariensis, Commiphora molmol, Commiphora myrrha, Common Myrrh, Didin, Didthin, Gomme de Myrrhe, Gum Myrrh, Heerabol, Hemprichia erythraea, Mirra, Mirrh, Mo Yao, Murrah, Myrrh Gum, Myrrha, Myrrhe, Myrrhe Africaine, Myrrhe Amère, Myrrhe d’Arabie, Myrrhe Bisabol, Myrrhe Douce, Myrrhe de Somalie, Myrrhe du Yémen, Opopanax, Resina Commiphorae, Somalien Myrrh, Yemen Myrrh.
Plant Size Between 9 and 15 ft.
Bark Gray-colored thick barks
Trunk Knotted
Leaf Green leaves
Flower White
Fruit Small, brown and oval
Oil Consistency Viscous consistency
Oil Color Yellowish, orange color
Flavor/Aroma Warm, earthy, Smoky, sweet or sometimes bitter smell
Taste Strong, unpleasant and bitter taste
Plant Parts Used Resin, or sap-like substance
Method of Extraction Steam distillation
Commonly Blended with
  • Frankincense
  • Sandalwood
  • Cypress
  • Eucalyptus
  • Pine
  • Tea tree
  • Juniper berry
  • Palmarosa
  • Vetiver
  • Rosemary
  • Chamomile
  • Patchouli
  • Lavender
  • Geranium
  • Ylang ylang
  • Jasmine
  • Neroli
  • Grapefruit
  • Lemon
  • Bergamot
  • Cardamom
  • Cinnamon
  • Clove
  • Coriander
  • Ginger
  • Lemongrass
  • Melaleuca
  • Peppermint
  • Spearmint
  • Thyme
  • Vetiver
  • Wintergreen
Health benefits
  • Anti-Cancer Benefits
  • Anti-Parasitic
  • Potent Antioxidant
  • Antimicrobial and Antiviral
  • Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Fungal Benefits
  • Circulatory
  • Skin Health
  • Assists your digestive system
  • Stimulant
  • Relaxation
  • Relief for Upper Respiratory Problems
  • Helps Prevent Gum Disease and Mouth Infections
  • Good for hair
  • Good for cold and cough
  • Helps Treat Hypothyroidism
  • May Help Treat Skin Cancer
  • Treatment for Ulcers and Wounds
Traditional uses and benefits
  • Add 1–2 drops to toothpaste for added cleansing benefits.
  • Add to your lotion/moisturizer to help reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.
  • Add 1–2 drops to ¼ cup of water with a little agave or honey to help ease the stomach.
  • It’s aroma help to improve symptoms of bronchitis, colds, and coughs.
  • Apply Myrrh to your skin along with jojoba or almond oil for amazing anti-aging benefits, skin rejuvenation, and healing wounds.
  • Apply Myrrh to inflammation areas to reduce swelling.
  • Helps to relieve coughing, congestion, and reducing phlegm.
  • Amazing for upset stomachs, diarrhea, and indigestion.
  • Can help heal fungal infections such as athlete’s foot or ring worm.
  • Myrrh is believed to have been mixed with wine and given to people awaiting execution to reduce pain.
  • The diluted form can be used as a chest rub to get relief from colds & coughs and bronchitis.
  • When applied to wounds or external injuries, it can control swelling by preventing the buildup of fluids in the affected tissues.
  • To relieve mental tension, vaporize 2 drops of Myrrh, and 4 drops of Clove Bud.
  • To relax coughs, inhale 2 drops of Myrrh, and 4 drops of Himalayan Cedarwood.
  • To loosen up chest infections, mix Myrrh with Black Spruce, and Laurel Leaf, and massage it into the chest.
  • To quicken the healing process, mix Myrrh with German Chamomile and Frankincense and apply it to the wound twice daily.
  • To draw out infections in the skin use a hot compress with 2 drops of Myrrh, and 2 drops of Bergamot.
  • For total relaxation, mix with grape seed oil, then add 3 drops to a warm bath and soak thoroughly.
  • Blend with frankincense and apply all over the body to help heal and tone the skin.
  • Blend with Himalayan cedarwood and inhale deeply to combat cold and relax coughing spells.
  • To speed up the healing process of wounds, blend myrrh essential oil with German chamomile and Frankincense and apply to the wound twice daily.
Precautions
  • Possible skin sensitivity.
  • Keep out of reach of children.
  • Pregnant women should avoid taking myrrh because it may enhance uterine contractions.
  • Avoid contact with eyes, inner ears, and sensitive areas.
  • If taken internally, myrrh may cause stomach upset and diarrhea.
  • People with a medical condition related to the heart should ask a doctor before using myrrh oil.
  • Myrrh may lower blood sugar, therefore it is not recommended for people with diabetes or other blood sugar conditions.
  • Myrrh oil is not recommended for people using anticoagulants such as Warfarin as it may have potential interactions with this medication.
Other Facts
  • It is commonly used as a base for perfume and other fragrances.
  • Myrrh can be burned as incense to repel mosquitos and other insects.
  • It can be used on animals’ skin and coat and at the same time a natural remedy to repel those itchy-creeper-blood-sucker ticks and fleas from them.

In order to harvest myrrh, the tree trunks must be cut to release the resin. The resin is allowed to dry and begins to look like tears all along the tree trunk with a unique sweet and smoky aroma that is then used to make myrrh oil. The resin is then collected and the essential oil is made from the sap via steam distillation. Myrrh oil has a golden yellow or brownish color with a viscous consistency and a warm, earthy, Smoky, sweet, or sometimes bitter smell. The rich aroma makes it a great base for fragrances and perfumes. Myrrh essential oil blends well with Frankincense, Lavender, Rose, Rosewood, Sandalwood, Tea Tree, and Thyme.

Myrrh Oil About It

1.  Origins

Myrrh was extremely valuable in the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Today, it’s popular all over the world.

2.  Name

The word “myrrh” comes from the Arabic word “murr,” meaning bitter, because of its sharp taste. In other words, you wouldn’t want to add this oil to your morning smoothie.

3.  Plant

Myrrh essential oil is steam distilled from the red-brown resin of the Commiphora myrrha tree, identifiable by its knotted trunk and white flowers.

4.  Aroma

Its earthy, sweet, and slightly spicy aroma can help promote feelings of spirituality during mindfulness practices like meditation and yoga.

5.  Bath time

In need of a little TLC? A few drops of Myrrh oil in a warm bath can create a luxurious, spa-like atmosphere. Combine it with Lavender or Lemon, sit back, and breathe in a warm, uplifting aroma.

6.  Haircare

Shampooing your hair might leave it squeaky clean, but it also removes important oils that help hair stay strong. Add a couple drops of Myrrh essential oil to your shampoo to help keep your hair and scalp hydrated.

7.  Skincare

Myrrh is a common ingredient in luxury beauty products, especially products that go on the skin. Just a couple drops of Myrrh essential oil can make even drugstore products feel high-end.

8.  Home and family

There’s nothing like a home filled with a relaxing and uplifting scent after a long day. Diffuse Myrrh essential oil in the evening as you and your loved ones unwind together.

9.  Holiday cheer

Myrrh has long been seen as a symbol of sharing during the holiday season. Fill your home with the essence of the holidays by diffusing Myrrh with Frankincense and Orange.

10. History

Myrrh essential oil has been used for thousands of years in traditional healing therapies and in religious ceremonies. Common myrrh oil uses historically, include:

  • Fragrance
  • Embalming
  • Flavoring for food
  • Treating hay fever
  • As an antiseptic to clean and treat wounds
  • As a paste to help stop bleeding

The Chinese frequently used myrrh as a medicine, and it remains a part of traditional Chinese medicine to this day. The main myrrh oil use by the Egyptians was for embalming and the Jews used it to make the holy anointing oil that was used in worship services. (3)

The most common historical myrrh oil use was to burn the resin over hot coals. This would release a mysterious, spiritual quality into any room before a religious ceremony. It has also been used in aromatherapy for its meditative quality or for prayer, usually in combination with frankincense.

The smell of myrrh has been traditionally seen as a symbol of suffering, burned at funerals or other solemn events. But, at times myrrh is blended with citrus oils to help produce a more uplifting aroma. These lighter blends have been used to help promote inspiration and emotional insight.

Health benefits of Myrrh Essential oil

Myrrh oil is commonly used as a remedy for a variety of ailments. Researchers have become interested in myrrh due to its strong antioxidant activity and potential as a cancer treatment. It has also been shown to be effective in fighting certain types of parasitic infections. Here are some of the main benefits of myrrh oil use:

Anti-Cancer Benefits

Myrrh has also been found to have anti-cancer benefits. The research found that myrrh was able to reduce the propagation of human cancer cells. Researchers found that myrrh inhibited growth in eight different types of cancer cells, especially gynecological cancers. Although further research is necessary to determine exactly how to use myrrh for cancer treatment, this initial research is promising.(1)

Kills Harmful Bacteria

Ancient Egyptians used myrrh and other essential oils to embalm mummies, as the oils not only provide a nice scent but also slow decay. Scientists now know this is because the oils kill bacteria and other microbes (5).

Additionally, in Biblical times, myrrh incense — often in combination with frankincense — was burned in places of worship to help purify the air and prevent the spread of contagious diseases, including those caused by bacteria. One recent study found that burning myrrh and frankincense incense reduced airborne bacterial counts by 68% (6). Preliminary animal research suggests that myrrh can directly kill bacteria, as well as stimulate the immune system to make more white blood cells, which also kill bacteria (7).

In test-tube studies, myrrh oil has strong effects against several infectious bacteria, including some drug-resistant ones (3910). In one test-tube study, myrrh oil at a low dilution of 0.1% killed all dormant Lyme disease bacteria, which can persist in some people after antibiotic treatment and continue to cause illness (11).

Still, more studies are needed to determine whether myrrh oil can treat persistent Lyme infections.

Myrrh oil has been used to kill harmful bacteria long before scientists discovered that microbes cause contagious illnesses. It may have an impact on some drug-resistant and Lyme disease bacteria.

May Support Oral Health

Due to its antimicrobial properties, myrrh has traditionally been used to treat oral infections and inflammation (12). Some natural mouthwashes and toothpaste contain myrrh oil, which is approved as a flavoring by the FDA (1314).

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What’s more, when people with Behcet’s disease — an inflammatory disorder — used a myrrh mouthwash to treat painful mouth sores four times daily for a week, 50% of them had complete pain relief and 19% had complete healing of their mouth sores (15). Test-tube studies suggest that mouthwash containing myrrh oil may also help gingivitis, which is inflammation of the gums around your teeth due to a buildup of plaque (12). Yet, more studies are needed to confirm these benefits. Keep in mind that you should never swallow myrrh oral-care products, as high doses of myrrh can be toxic (15).

Additionally, if you have oral surgery, it may be best to avoid myrrh mouthwash during healing. A test-tube study found that stitches — especially silk ones — can degrade when exposed to myrrh, though they held up in the doses typically found in mouthwash (16Trusted Source).

Some natural mouthwashes and toothpastes contain myrrh oil, which may help relieve mouth sores and gum inflammation. Never swallow these products.

Supports Skin Health and May Help Heal Sores

Traditional uses of myrrh include treating skin wounds and infections. Today, scientists are testing these applications (17). One test-tube study of human skin cells found that an essential oil blend containing myrrh helped heal wounds (18). Another study noted that myrrh and other essential oils applied via baths helped mothers heal skin wounds from vaginal deliveries (19).

However, multiple oils were used simultaneously in these studies, so the individual effects of myrrh for wound healing are unclear. Specific studies on myrrh oil are more telling. A test-tube study on 247 different essential oil combinations found that myrrh oil mixed with sandalwood oil was especially effective at killing microbes that infect skin wounds (20). Additionally, in one test-tube study, myrrh oil alone inhibited 43–61% of the growth of five fungi that cause skin conditions, including ringworm and athlete’s foot (17).

Human research is needed to confirm these benefits. However, if you want to try myrrh for general skin health, many natural ointments and soaps contain it. You can also apply diluted myrrh oil directly on your skin.

Applying diluted myrrh oil on your skin may aid wound healing and fight microbes that can cause infections. The oil may also deter the growth of skin fungi, including ringworm and athlete’s foot.

Combats Pain and Swelling

Pain — such as headaches, joint pain and back pain — is a common complaint.

Myrrh oil contains compounds that interact with opioid receptors and tell your brain you’re not in pain. Myrrh also blocks the production of inflammatory chemicals that can lead to swelling and pain (122122).

When people prone to headaches took a multi-ingredient supplement containing myrrh’s pain-relieving compounds, their headache pain was reduced by about two-thirds during the six-month study (23).

Further research is needed to confirm these benefits. The supplement tested isn’t available in the US, and ingesting myrrh oil is not recommended.

You can buy myrrh-containing homeopathic rubbing oils and other essential oils meant to relieve pain when applied directly to sore body parts. However, these haven’t been studied.

Myrrh oil contains plant compounds that may temporarily relieve pain by signaling your brain that you’re not in pain. It may also block your body’s production of inflammatory chemicals that lead to swelling and pain.

May Be a Powerful Antioxidant

Myrrh may be a powerful antioxidant, a compound that combats oxidative damage. Oxidative damage from free radicals contributes to aging and some diseases. A test-tube study found that myrrh oil was more effective than vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant, at fighting free radicals (2425). Additionally, in an animal study, myrrh oil helped protect the liver against lead-induced oxidative damage in direct proportion to the amount of myrrh given prior to lead exposure (26).

It isn’t known whether inhaling myrrh oil or applying it topically — which are two safe uses of myrrh oil for people — helps protect your body against oxidative damage.

Test-tube and animal studies show that myrrh oil is a powerful antioxidant and even more effective than vitamin E. However, human studies are needed.

Kills Some Parasites

You can become infected with parasites from many sources, including pets, sexual activity and contaminated food or water (27). Two common parasitic infections in the US are trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted disease, and giardiasis, an intestinal infection (282930).

In a preliminary study, women who failed to respond to standard drug treatment for trichomoniasis were given an oral drug, Mirazid, made of myrrh sap and its essential oil. About 85% of them were cured of the infection (31).

Additionally, an animal study found that the same myrrh drug effectively treated giardiasis (32). Some human research suggests that this myrrh drug also may be effective against the parasite Fasciola gigantic, which can cause liver and bile duct diseases. However, other studies failed to see a benefit (33343536). Miraz is not widely prescribed at this time.

Though more research is needed, myrrh and its oil may prove helpful for treating parasites, especially in cases of drug resistance. Ingesting myrrh oil is not advised, and long-term safety must be assessed (37).

Preliminary studies suggest that a myrrh-containing medicine may help treat some common parasites, but more research on its effectiveness and safety is needed.

Anti-Parasitic

Medicine has been made using myrrh as a treatment for fascioliasis infection, a parasite that has been infecting humans worldwide. This parasite is generally transmitted by ingesting aquatic algae and other plants. A medication made with myrrh was able to decrease symptoms of the infection, as well as a drop in parasite egg count found in the feces.(2)

Relieves Spasms

It provides relief from unwanted contractions or spasms and therefore eases cramps, aches, and muscle pain. According to a 6-month long study published in the Edizioni Minerva Medica, when people suffering from severe headaches consumed multi-ingredient supplements consisting of myrrh’s pain-relieving compounds, their headache pain had gone down by two-thirds. However, additional research is required to corroborate the benefits. [6]

Antimicrobial and Antiviral

Myrrh essential oil does not allow microbes to grow or infect your system. It can be used to prevent any ailment resulting from microbial infection, such as fever, food poisoning, cough & cold, mumps, measles, pox, and infections of wounds. It has no adverse side effects, unlike other antibiotics, such as weakening of the liver or digestive malfunction.

Anti-Fungal Benefits

Myrrh was used to treat wounds and prevent infections. It can still be used on minor skin irritations such as athlete’s foot, ringworm, and acne. Apply a few drops to a clean towel first before applying it directly to the skin.

Circulatory

This powerful essential oil encourages blood circulation and ensures the proper supply of oxygen to the tissues. This is good for attaining a proper metabolic rate as well as for boosting the immune system. Increasing the blood flow to the more obscure corners of your body, the better the nutrients and oxygen reach those body parts so they function better and stay healthy.

Myrrh Oil Promotes Sweating

Sweating is an immensely important body function, as it helps to purify your entire body. It gets rid of the unwanted toxins, uric acid, excess salts, excess fat, excess water, and any other lifestyle-based toxins that may be in your system. This helps your body stay clean, and affects the overall function of all your organs and systems. Myrrh essential oil promotes sweating in your body. It can, therefore, be used as a purifying agent so that you can stay healthy and toxin-free.

Stimulates Blood Circulation

This powerful essential oil stimulates blood circulation and ensures a proper supply of oxygen to the tissues. This is good for attaining a proper metabolic rate as well as for boosting the immune system. Increasing the blood flow to all the parts of the body helps in staying healthy.

Skin Health

Myrrh can be quite helpful for maintaining skin health. It can help soothe chapped or cracked skin. It is commonly added to skincare products to help with moisturizing and also for fragrance. Ancient Egyptians used it to prevent aging and maintain healthy skin.

Assists your digestive system

As we know that Myrrh oil is carminative and stomachic in nature, aiding in relieving gases and promoting the process of digestion. It helps in restoring the appetite, treating indigestion, nausea, flatulence, stomach pain, and constipation by stimulating the flow of saliva, bile, and other digestive juices. You can either use 2 to 3 drops of Myrrh oil in steam inhalation or a diffuser for calming the digestive system. Massaging your tummy and abdomen with 2 drops of Myrrh oil blended with sesame oil can help in easing sluggish digestion.

Stimulant

Myrrh essential oil stimulates thoughts, blood circulation, digestion, secretions, nervous activity, and excretion. It stimulates the pumping action of the heart, the secretion of digestive juices and bile into the stomach and it keeps you alert and active by stimulating the brain and the nervous system.

Relaxation

Myrrh is commonly used in aromatherapy for massages. It can also be added to a warm bath or applied directly to the skin.

It can work as an expectorant to help relieve the symptoms of coughs and colds. It can be used to relieve congestion and help reduce phlegm.

Helps Prevent Gum Disease and Mouth Infections

Due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties, myrrh can help relieve inflammation of the mouth and gums caused by diseases such as gingivitis and mouth ulcers. It can also be used as a mouth wash to prevent gum disease. It can also freshen your breath and is commonly used as an ingredient in mouthwash and toothpaste.

Good for hair

Myrrh is considered wonderful for dry hair and scalp, thus used in the treatment of dandruff problems. It can be used along with other carrier oil for more benefits. As astringent it improves the grip of hair roots on hair and therefore prevents hair loss. It can be used along with frankincense oil for shining hair.

Good for cold and cough

Myrrh is a wonderful expectorant and good for cold and cough. It relieves congestion and helps ease mucus deposits from the lungs and respiratory tracts. It provides relief from congestion and breathing problems. Traditionally it has been used topically as herbal medicine for preventing herpes and quick healing.

Helps Treat Hypothyroidism

Myrrh is a natural remedy for hypothyroidism or a low functioning thyroid. Since it helps reduce stress, it can also help decrease stress on an overtaxed thyroid. Put 2-3 drops directly onto the thyroid area daily to help decrease symptoms.

May Help Treat Skin Cancer

As discussed above, myrrh is being studied for its potential anti-cancer benefits. It has been shown to be beneficial for skin cancer. Consider using it in addition to other traditional treatments, if you have been identified with skin cancer. Apply a few drops per day directly onto the cancer site, always testing a small area first.

Myrrh can help strengthen the body’s cells by acting as an astringent. It was used traditionally to help stop bleeding. Due to its astringent effects, it may also help prevent hair loss by strengthening the roots in the scalp.

Treatment for Ulcers and Wounds

Myrrh has the power to increase the function of white blood cells, critical for wound healing. In research, it was found to decrease the occurrence of ulcers and improve their healing time.

A primary myrrh oil use is as a fungicide or antiseptic. It can help reduce fungal infections such as athlete’s foot or ringworm when applied directly to the affected area. It can also be used on small scrapes and wounds to prevent infection.

Astringent Properties

Myrrh essential oil is an astringent, which means that it strengthens the gums and muscles, intestines, and other internal organs, and smoothens the skin. It also strengthens the grip of hair roots, thereby preventing hair loss. One more serious aspect of this astringent property is that it stops hemorrhaging in wounds. When this astringency makes the blood vessels contract and checks the flow of blood, it can stop you from losing too much blood when wounded.

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Relieves Cough

Myrrh essential oil is good for colds and coughs. It fights the viral infections that can cause them, as well as relieves congestion, and reduces the deposition of phlegm in the lungs and respiratory tracts.

Acts as Stomachic

Myrrh oil is beneficial for the all-around health of your stomach.

Anti-catarrhal Properties

This property of myrrh essential oil relieves you of excess mucus and phlegm and troubles associated with mucus deposition like congestion, breathing trouble, heaviness in the chest, and cough.

Increases Perspiration

Myrrh essential oil increases perspiration and removes toxins, extra salt, and excess water from your body. Sweating also cleans the skin’s pores and helps harmful gases like nitrogen escape.

Promotes Restful Sleep

By removing tension in mind and body, you can get the most out of your nightly rest. Try adding 2-3 drops of the Frankincense & Myrrh blend to a teaspoon of soothing carrier oil like Apricot Kernel, and massage into the skin before bedtime.

Perfect for Prayer and Meditation

With its holy and ritualistic background, it only makes sense that the oils in this blend would assist with the focus and calmness that benefit our spiritual side. We recommend diffusing Frankincense & Myrrh to allow whirring thoughts to come to a standstill.

Stimulates Nervous System

The nervous system is probably the most important system in your body. The source of your nervous system is the brain which has control to all parts of your body system. It is because myrrh oil contains properties that could make the sure optimal function of your brain and at the same time make sure the blood distribution to your brain is under control.

Youthful Skin

You can use myrrh oil on your skin. A great product that can be added to your daily moisturizer, it is proven that myrrh oil has anti-aging properties, and will promote rejuvenated and youthful-looking skin.

It also has soothing properties, so your new moisturizer mix will feel much smoother, and cause a soothing sensation immediately after applying. Reducing fine lines and wrinkles, what more could you ask for?

Mouth and Throat Cleanse

Next on our list of the best-proven benefits of myrrh oil is that this essential oil is about to cleanse the mouth and throat with ease. With incredible cleansing properties, the oil might just be your next best-kept secret for oral hygiene.

Adding a drop of your toothpaste is beneficial enough to cleanse your entire mouth. Plus, it’s effective enough to replace your mouthwash. Add a drop of oil to two ounces of water, and you’ve got a brand new wash to gargle.

Post-Shave Oil

Now that we know that myrrh oil is beneficial for your skin, we can touch on the fact that it also makes a great post-shave oil to soothe the skin after taking a razor to it. Due to its soothing properties, it will easily be able to relieve irritated skin and can be used as a skin serum.

This can be applied on the face, under the arms, and even on the legs to prevent razor burn and any irritation. Plus, it smells great and provides only a few drops to do its magic.

Spa Night Companion

To complete our list of the best-proven benefits of myrrh oil, we had to mention that it is a great oil to amp up your at-home spa nights. A great product to soothe dry skin, add some great fragrance to the atmosphere, and even soften our cuticles to prepare for a mani-pedi.

Try a few drops on your dry feet, and rub it into the dry spots on your face for the best benefits. A great spa treatment, you won’t be able to take a spa-inspired bath without this essential oil again.

Suggested Popular Uses of Myrrh Essential Oil

  • To promote oral health add 1-2 drops to your toothpaste.
  • To reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles include it in your regular lotion/moisturizer.
  • Add 1–2 drops to 1/4 cup of water with a little agave or honey to help ease digestive discomfort.
  • Place 1-2 drops of myrrh essential oil in your palms and cup over the nose and mouth while you breathe naturally for trust.
  • To restore appetite and calm the digestive system, use 2-3 drops in a diffuser or steam inhalation. Can also be added to carrier oil and massaged on the abdomen.
  • To calm anger and stress, use 2-3 drops in a diffuser.
  • For asthma, coughs, colds, and sore throats use 2-3 drops in 1 ounce of carrier oil. Rub on the chest for asthma, coughs, and cold, and on the throat, if sore. Can also use 2-3 drops in a diffuser or steam inhalation.
  • For athlete’s foot, bedsores, boils, skin ulcers, sores, and wounds, use 2-3 drops in a cold compress and apply to the affected area. Can also be added to a cotton ball and dabbed on directly; use lightly,
  • Add 2-3 drops to 2 tablespoons of liquid lanolin, and massage into affected areas to get rid of chapped skin or hemorrhoids.
  • Mix 2-3 drops in a glass of water and swish in mouth. Spit out to get rid of mouth disorders, like gingivitis, mouth ulcers, and spongy gums.
  • To rejuvenate mature complexions and to smooth out wrinkles, wash face, then use 2-3 drops with 1 ounce of almond carrier oil, and rub gently onto face.
  • Massage 3-4 drops of myrrh essential oil over the back of the neck and forehead, working into the reflex points of the feet, or consider taking them internally. Also consider frankincense, sandalwood (or Hawaiian sandalwood), or lavender for soothing brain health.
  • Massage 3-4 drops of myrrh essential oil over the area of concern, working into the reflex points of the feet, or consider taking them internally to get relief from Cancer.
  • Massage myrrh essential oil over the area of concern several times a day or more frequently as desired for congestion.
  • Apply several drops over the stomach or the bottoms of the feet multiple times a day. Consider layering with eucalyptus oil or lemon essential oil to get rid of dysentery.
  • For Hashimoto’s Diffuse or inhale from your hands several times a day, apply several drops topically over the thyroid, and consider layering with lemongrass.
  • Diffuse or inhale myrrh oil from your hands, or apply several drops to the soles of the feet or over the liver several times a day. Also consider melaleuca, frankincense, or other antiviral essential oils for hepatitis.
  • Depending on the type of infection, consider topical, aromatic, or internal applications. Also, consider oils such as oregano oil or an immune blend.
  • Apply several drops topically as indicated, or consider taking them internally for systemic support for inflammation.
  • Massage 3-4 drops over the area of concern several times a day. Also, consider a natural detox support blend or frankincense for liver Cirrhosis.
  • Massage several drops of myrrh oil topically over the area of concern as desired. Consider layering with other oils such as a tension blend, a muscle/joint blend, or frankincense for pain management.
  • Consider adding 5-6 drops of myrrh essential oil to an empty veggie capsule to take internally 1-3 times a day. Also, consider oils such as an immune blend of oregano oil to get relief of parasites.
  • Consider adding 5-6 drops to an empty veggie capsule and take it internally with food 2-3 times a day. Or apply topically over the area for prostate cancer.
  • Mix 2-3 drops to 1 tsp of coconut oil and apply to the area as desired for skin, chapped/cracked.
  • Massage 2-3 drops over the area of concern daily. For help in preventing stretch marks use 2-3 times a day with coconut oil for stretch marks.
  • Apply 1-2 drops of myrrh essential oil, 1-2 drops of lavender, and 1-2 drops of helichrysum with a base of coconut oil or aloe Vera immediately after sun exposure, and 2-3 times a day.
  • Add several drops to your skincare routine or use homemade sunscreen recipes for sun protection.
  • Massage 3-4 drops over the area of concern or into the reflex points of the feet to support the body’s healing processes for tumors.
  • Add 2-3 drops to an empty veggie capsule and take with food up to 3 times a day for ulcer, duodenal.
  • Consider using 2 drops topically or on a tampon for 30 minutes, or massage into the reflex points of the feet 1-3 times a day for vaginal infection.
  • Apply 1-3 drops of myrrh essential oil on the area 2-3 times daily to get relief from weeping wounds.
  • Massage 1-2 drops into the area of concern daily. Add to your daily moisturizer, but avoid getting any oil in the eyes for wrinkles.

Myrrh Oil Uses

Essential oil therapy has been used for thousands of years and is the practice of using oils for their health benefits. Each essential oil has its own unique benefit and can be incorporated as an alternative treatment for a variety of ailments.

Generally, oils are inhaled, sprayed in the air, massaged into the skin, and at times taken by mouth. Fragrances are strongly connected to our emotions and memories as our scent receptors are located next to the emotional centers in our brain, the amygdala, and hippocampus.

Generally myrrh oil uses are similar to using other aromatherapy oils

1. Diffuse or Inhale It

You can purchase an essential oil distiller to use throughout the house when you are trying to achieve a certain mood. Or add a few drops to hot water and inhale the steam. Myrrh oil can also be inhaled when you are sick to help improve the symptoms of bronchitis, colds or coughs.

It can also be blended with other essential oils to create a new scent. It blends well with citrus oil, such as bergamot, grapefruit or lemon to help lighten up its fragrance. (13)

2. Apply It Directly to the Skin

It is best to mix myrrh with carrier oils such as jojoba, almond or grape seed oil before applying it to the skin. It can also be mixed with an unscented lotion and used directly on the skin. Due to its antioxidant properties, it is great for anti-aging, skin rejuvenation and wound treatment.

You can also use myrrh to make various natural skin care products when it is blended with other ingredients. For example, consider making homemade frankincense and myrrh lotion to help treat and tone the skin.

3. Use as a Cold Compress

Myrrh oil has many therapeutic properties, therefore add a few drops to a cold compress and apply it directly to any infected or inflamed area for relief. It is antibacterial, antifungal and helps to reduce swelling and inflammation.

4. Relief for Upper Respiratory Problems

It may work as an expectorant to help relieve the symptoms of coughs and cold. Try this oil to to relieve congestion and help reduce phlegm.

 5. Decrease in Digestive Problems

Another popular myrrh oil use is to help relieve digestive problems such as stomach upset, diarrhea, and indigestion.

6. Helps Prevent Gum Disease and Mouth Infections

Due to its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, myrrh can help relieve inflammation of the mouth and gums caused by diseases such as gingivitis and mouth ulcers. It can also be used as a mouth rinse to prevent gum disease. It can also freshen your breath and is commonly used as an ingredient in mouthwash and toothpaste.

7. Helps Treat Hypothyroidism

Myrrh is a remedy for hypothyroidism, or a low functioning thyroid, in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Ayurvedic medicine. Certain compounds in myrrh may be responsible for its thyroid-stimulating effects. (14) Put 2–3 drops directly onto the thyroid area daily to help decrease symptoms.

8. May Help Treat Skin Cancer

As discussed above, myrrh is being studied for its potential anti-cancer benefits. It has been shown to be beneficial against skin cancer cells in laboratory studies. (15) Consider using it in addition to other traditional treatments, if you have been diagnosed with skin cancer. Apply a few drops per day directly onto the cancer site, always testing a small area first.

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9. Treatment for Ulcers and Wounds

Myrrh has the power to increase the function of white blood cells, critical for wound healing. It was found to decrease the incidence of ulcers and improve their healing time, in one study published in the Journal of Immunotoxicology. (10)

A primary myrrh oil use is as a fungicide or antiseptic. It can help reduce fungal infections such as athlete’s foot or ring worm, when applied directly to the affected area. It can also be used on small scrapes and wounds to prevent infection.

Myrrh can help strengthen the body’s cells by acting as an astringent. It was used traditionally to help stop bleeding. Due to its astringent effects, it may also help prevent hair loss by strengthening the roots in the scalp.

10. Diffuse or Inhale It

You can purchase an essential oil distiller to use throughout the house when you are trying to achieve a certain mood. Or add a few drops to hot water and inhale the steam. Myrrh oil can also be inhaled when you are sick to help improve the symptoms of bronchitis, colds, or coughs.

11. Apply it directly to the Skin

It is best to mix myrrh with carrier oils such as jojoba, almond, or grapeseed oil before applying it to the skin. It can also be mixed with an unscented lotion and used directly on the skin. Due to its antioxidant properties, it is great for anti-aging, skin rejuvenation, or healing of wounds.

12. Use as a Cold Compress

Myrrh oil has many healing properties, therefore add a few drops to a cold compress and apply it directly to any infected or inflamed area for relief. It is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and helps reduce swelling and inflammation.

How to Make Myrrh Oil

Myrrh oil is traditionally steam-distilled directly from myrrh resin. The oil has a milder and more pleasant smell than the actual resin, although some formulas are a bit strong. You can try making your own myrrh oil infusion at home.

Materials:

  • Myrrh resin
  • Olive or any vegetable carrier oil
  • Glass vial
  • Mason jar

Procedure:

  1. Put a cup of the oil of your choice into a small saucepan, along with a quarter ounce (or seven grams) of myrrh resin to the oil. Set the heat to low, and allow the mixture to sit for six hours, occasionally stirring it.
  2. Put the oil in a mason jar and put it in a place with direct sunlight, such as by a window, for up to two weeks.
  3. Filter the oil to remove any residues.
  4. Pour the myrrh oil into a glass vial.

INTERACTIONS

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Talk with your health provider.Myrrh might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking myrrh along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (Diabeta, Glynase PresTabs, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Warfarin (Coumadin)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Taking myrrh might decrease how well warfarin (Coumadin) works to slow blood clotting. This could increase the chance of blood clotting.

DOSING

The appropriate dose of myrrh depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for myrrh. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Myrrh Side Effects

Myrrh does have some side effects that need to be considered before using it therapeutically. As always, it is best to speak to your doctor or trusted healthcare provider first.

Since one of the most common myrrh oil uses is topical, people with sensitive skin should be cautious. Myrrh has been found to cause dermatitis, or inflammation of the skin, in some people. Always test it first in a small area before applying it all over the skin to make sure you don’t have any allergic reaction.

Myrrh may have certain effects on health, especially when used in large doses. Some of the side effects of myrrh include:

1. Diarrhea

Taking myrrh internally may cause irritation to the digestive tract and lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and bloating. It is advisable to seek medical attention in case diarrhea continues for more than a couple of days. Persistent diarrhea may contribute to dehydration.

2. Rash

Applying myrrh directly to the skin may lead to rash and irritation. The affected area may appear red, swollen, itchy, and dry. This irritation usually goes away in a day or two. In case it persists, consults your doctor.

3. Severe side effects

There may be some severe side effects when myrrh is used in doses higher than 2 to 4g. These side effects include irregular heart rate and irritation to the kidneys. In case you develop symptoms such as chest pain, difficulty in urination, blood in the urine, erratic heartbeat, and trouble in breathing, it is necessary to seek immediate medical care.

4. Interaction with other medications

In some cases, myrrh may interact with other medications. Those who take medications for diabetes should avoid myrrh since it can reduce blood sugar. When the blood sugar levels drop too low, symptoms such as hunger, headache, tiredness, trembling and dizziness may occur. Myrrh should also not be taken along with anticoagulants as it may lead to problems in blood clotting.

5. Using Myrrh during Pregnancy

Myrrh is not recommended for pregnant women since it may work as a uterine stimulant. When consumed, myrrh may cause the uterine muscles to tighten and this may encourage menstrual flow. Since such processes can lead to a miscarriage, pregnant women should avoid using myrrh. It is also not prescribed for breastfeeding mothers and for very young children.

Potential Risks

Like other essential oils, myrrh oil is very concentrated, so you only need a few drops at a time. Avoid diffusing it close to babies and young children, as it’s uncertain how much they’ll inhale and how much is safe.

Additionally, no one should swallow myrrh oil, as it can be toxic (rx).

Some people should be especially cautious with myrrh oil and may need to avoid it entirely. Bear this in mind if any of the following conditions apply to you (rx, rx):

Special Precautions & Warnings

May Cause Heart Arrhythmia – Myrrh oil is known to be toxic in large amounts, and your heart is one of the things at risk if you consume it. Myrrh can increase your heart rate and lead to arrhythmias (changes to normal heart rate) if consumed. People with known heart conditions should be particularly careful about avoiding the consumption of myrrh oil.May Interfere with Blood-Thinning Medications – Similarly, it appears that myrrh oil can significantly interfere with certain anticoagulant medications (blood thinners). Drugs like Warfarin are critical for the health of the people taking them. If you are on a blood-thinning medication, avoid consuming myrrh oil to help keep your medication working appropriately.May Cause Hypoglycemia – Myrrh has been shown to reduce blood sugar levels in some studies. However, the effect is still being studied for safety. People with diabetes should avoid consuming myrrh oil in order to reduce their risk of hypoglycemia, or blood sugar levels that are too low.

Pregnancy Concerns – People who are pregnant should never consume myrrh oil in any capacity, because it may be linked to miscarriages and birth defects. Myrrh may cause uterine cramps and bleed, leading to significant medical problems.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding: Taking myrrh by mouth during pregnancy is UNSAFE and should be avoided. Myrrh can stimulate the uterus and might cause a miscarriage. There isn’t enough information to rate the safety of using myrrh on the skin during pregnancy, so until more is known, it’s best to avoid this use.Breast-feeding mothers should also avoid using myrrh. Not enough is known about the safety of using myrrh when breastfeeding.

Diabetes: Myrrh might lower blood sugar. There is a concern that if it is used along with medications that lower blood sugar, blood sugar might drop too low. If you use myrrh as well as medications for diabetes, monitor your blood sugar carefully.

Fever: Myrrh might make a fever worse. Use with caution.

Heart problems: Large amounts of myrrh can affect heart rate. If you have a heart condition, get your healthcare provider’s advice before starting myrrh.

Surgery: Since myrrh might affect blood glucose levels, there is a concern that it might interfere with blood glucose control during and after surgery. Stop using myrrh at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Systemic inflammation: If you have systemic inflammation, use myrrh with caution, since it might make this condition worse.

Uterine bleeding: Myrrh seems to be able to stimulate uterine bleeding, which is why some women use it to start their menstrual periods. If you have a uterine bleeding condition, use myrrh with caution, since it might make this condition worse.

If you’re pregnant, have heart problems, are planning surgery, or take blood thinners or diabetes medications, you may want to limit or avoid myrrh oil.

Safety Information

Possible skin sensitivity. Keep out of reach of children and if pregnant, please consult your physician before use. Avoid using on infants or very young children. Essential oils, by their concentrated nature, may sometimes cause sensitivity if used in their undiluted form.

From Where To Buy

 

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The International Federation of Aromatherapists, The Leading Aromatherapy Associations (Alliance of International Aromatherapists (AIA), International Aromatherapy and Aromatic Medicine Association, Aromatherapy Trade Council, and others) all state that essential oils should not be taken internally (regardless of purity or organic origin) unless under the guidance of a health care practitioner trained at an appropriate level or supervision of a Medical Doctor who is also qualified in clinical Aromatherapy. All cautions listed for individual oils do not include those cautions from ingestion. This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

References

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