Atropa Belladonna; Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions

Atropa Belladonna; Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions

Atropa Belladonna is a poisonous plant and homeopathic medicine, also called deadly nightshade. Its roots, leaves, and fruits contain alkaloids: atropine, hyoscyamine, and scopolamine. The risk of poisoning in children is important because of possible confusion with other berries. Atropa Belladonna acute intoxication is a severe condition, it’s should be considered in the presence of anti-cholinergic toxidrome, the differential diagnosis includes other plants or psychoactive drugs containing atropine. The treatment is mainly symptomatic including gastrointestinal decontamination with activated charcoal. In severe cases, physostigmine can be used as an antidote. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl with Atropa Belladonna poisoning which was administrated in a therapeutic purpose as a remedy to jaundice. The child presented essentially a central anticholinergic syndrome. She was admitted in the intensive care unit, the progression was favorable with symptomatic treatment.[#]

Belladonnine is a carbonyl compound and a member of naphthalenes.[#]

Indications/Uses of Atropa Belladonna

  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) – Early research suggests that taking belladonna along with the drug phenobarbital by mouth for one month does not improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Asthma
  • A whooping cough
  • Colds
  • Hay fever
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Motion sickness
  • Arthritis-like pain
  • Nerve problems
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Spasms and colic-like pain in the stomach and bile ducts

Companies that have made products containing belladonna state that it can improve various conditions. These include:

  • The common cold
  • Fever
  • Hooping a cough
  • Hay fever
  • Ean arache
  • Asthma
  • Motion sickness
  • Flu
  • A cough and sore throat
  • Joint and back pain
  • Arthritis pain
  • Spasms, or colic-like pain in the stomach or bile ducts
  • Nerve problems
  • Gout
  • Inflammation
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Hemorrhoids

Belladonna is an ingredient in creams, some liquids, ointments, and, in some cases, suppositories.

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Contra-Indications of Atropa Belladonna

  • kidney disease;
  • a blockage of your urinary tract (difficulty urinating);
  • a blockage in your intestines, severe ulcerative colitis, or ulcerative colitis complicated by toxic megacolon;
  • glaucoma; or
  • myasthenia gravis.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

  • numbness or tingling in your hands or feet;
  • liver disease;
  • ulcerative colitis;
  • thyroid problems;
  • high blood pressure, an irregular heartbeat, or any type of heart disease;
  • hiatal hernia or reflux disease;
  • enlargement of the prostate; or
  • asthma, chronic lung disease, or allergies.

The dosage of Atropa Belladonna

  • Atropia and its salts are used for ophthalmic purposes, to dilate the pupil and paralyze the accommodation.
  • Given internally or hypodermically, it is antagonistic to Opium and Morphine. Physostigma and Prussic Acid. Narcotic poisons and mushroom poisoning. Renal colic 1-200 of a grain hypodermically
  • Atropine injected subcutaneously in doses from a milligram upwards for intestinal obstruction threatening life.
  • Hypodermically 1-80 gr. night sweats in phthisis.
  • Atropia 1-20 gr. is antagonistic to 1 gr. Morphine.
  • Also used as a local anesthetic, antispasmodic, and to dry up secretions, milk, etc. Hypodermically 1-80 gr. night sweats in phthisis.[#]

Side Effects of Atropa Belladonna

The most common

  • an allergic reaction (swelling of your lips, tongue, or face, difficulty breathing, closing of your throat, or hives);
  • a headache, dizziness, or lightheadedness;
  • weakness or nervousness;
  • blurred vision, large pupils, or sensitivity of the eyes to bright light;
  • nausea, bloating, heartburn, or constipation;
  • changes in taste;
  • difficulty urinating;
  • decreased sweating; or
  • nasal congestion, stuffiness, or a dry mouth.
  • an irregular or fast heart rate;
  • a rash or flushing; or
  • eye pain.

Common

  • a headache, dizziness, or lightheadedness;
  • weakness or nervousness;
  • blurred vision, large pupils, or sensitivity of the eyes to bright light;
  • nausea, bloating, heartburn, or constipation;
  • changes in taste;
  • difficulty urinating;
  • decreased sweating; or
  • nasal congestion, stuffiness, or a dry mouth.
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Drug Interactions of Atropa Belladonna

  • amantadine
  • quinidine
  • antihistamines such as diphenhydramine, brompheniramine, triprolidine, and chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton, others), which are found in many over-the-counter and prescription cough, cold, and allergy medications;
  • decongestants and appetite suppressants such as phenylpropanolamine, phenylephrine, and pseudoephedrine, which are also found in many over-the-counter and prescription products
  • phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine  and prochlorperazine ;
  • other commonly used phenothiazines, including fluphenazine, mesoridazine, perphenazine, thioridazine, trifluoperazine, and promazine ;
  • tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline , doxepin , and nortriptyline or
  • other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine, clomipramine, desipramine, imipramine, protriptyline, and trimipramine.

Belladonna may increase the level of digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps) in your blood. Tell your doctor if you are taking digoxin so that your digoxin levels can be monitored and changes in your dosage can be made if necessary.

Atropa Belladonna

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